English power vocab20 cards

Tagged as: act, english, language, literature, education, history

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1

Subjugation

the act or process of bringing somebody, especially a people or nation, under the control of another, for example, military conquest Eg. The subjugation of the Jews under Hitler began initially with the loss of individual rights.

2

Caprice

sudden change or action; a tendency to sudden or impulsive decisions or changes of mind Eg. One of the most disturbing elements of the Shoah was the caprice under which guards operated arbitrarily deciding the fate of prisoners.

3

Subordinate

of lesser rank; of less importance Eg. The jews were considered subordinate by the Germans not only in society, but also in education and Nazi literature.

4

Puissance

power or might Eg. The puissance of the SS manifested itself in some of the most heinous acts of inhumanity in history.

5

Pragmatism

a straightforward practical way of thinking about things or dealing with problems, concerned with results rather than with principles or theories Eg. The pragmatism of many Jews was a key to their survival, but by no means was it a surety.

6

Probity

moral integrity; absolute moral correctness Eg. In times of war new definitions of probity emerge, with traditional expectations of morality becoming blurred.

7

Egregious

flagrant; conspicuously bad or offensive Eg. The egregious nature of the ‘final solution’ was evident in the widespread use of gas for extermination, because of its efficiency and economic benefits.

8

Waive

to relinquish a right; to refrain from claiming or insisting upon; forgo Eg. The defendant waived the right to legal counsel as they felt they could defend themselves adequately for such a frivolous charge.

9

Rue

regret Eg. Schindler came to rue his hedonism and flagrant waste of money.

10

Efficacy

effectiveness; the ability to produce the desired results Eg. Whilst Schindler gained greater efficacy through his ill-gotten wealth, it was only later that he came to realise the inherent value of his power.

11

Demagogue

a political leader who gains power by appealing to people’s emotions, instincts and prejudices in a way that’s considered manipulative or dangerous Eg. Hitler was a demagogue in his rule of Germany, almost deified in Nazi propaganda.

12

Omnipotence

possessing complete, unlimited or universal power and authority Eg. The omnipotent presence of the concentration camp guards served as a tangible reminder to the Jews that their fate lay in the hands of others.

13

Eulogise

to praise highly Eg. In eulogising the relative virtues of Oskar Schindler it is important not to focus too much on some of his innate human feelings, but the merits of “saving one life or the world entire”.

14

Hierarchical

rigidly graded in order Eg. Inevitably, there is a hierarchical base to most power structures.

15

Prig

smugly well-behaved person; someone who is regarded as taking pride in behaving in a very correct and proper way, and in feeling morally superior to others Eg. Some priggish people see themselves as the moral arbiters of their community, taking a som

16

Moot

- open to argument or dispute Eg. It is a moot point as to whether power corrupts individuals or whether they were inherently corrupt and this led to their ultimate acquisition of power.

17

Endow

to provide with money or something desirable Eg. Jess was endowed with many talents, not the least of which was her ability to predict the future by reading tea leaves.

18

Cogent

rationally persuasive; forceful and convincing to the intellect and reason Eg. The avaricious nature of Nazi officials proved to be a cogent ally for Schindler’s ultimate redemption.

19

Mitigate

to partly excuse crime; to make something less harsh, severe or violent Eg. Some people contend that Schindler’s eventual contrition does not mitigate the fact that he was a war profiteer.

20

Enmity

hostility, ill-will, hatred Eg. Despite the enmity that the Jews held towards the Nazis, many sought to establish their moral superiority by not seeking vengeance at the end of the war.